Coraggio in the Press

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September 21 2015

It might not be “press”—as it is on an art gallery website—but it’s a very good article by Michael Carter, whose bio on The New Museum's website reads as follows:

Michael Carter is a poet, writer, performer, and cultural critic, living in New York City. From 1982–92, he was the editor and publisher of the quintessentially East Village literary and arts journal/zine Redtape, and from 1988 to 2003 he was codirector of the MWF Video Club. His poetry and fiction have been published in many magazines and anthologies, including The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry, Up Is Up, But So Is Down: NY’s Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992, and From A Terrace in Prague. He is the author of two books of poems, Broken Noses and Metempsychoses (Fly By Night Press, 1996) and On Bolus Head (Cill Rialaig/En Garde Books, 2012)—poems and prints in collaboration with artist Brian Gormley. He was also lyricist and vocalist for the performance/rock band The Vacuum Bag (1985–96).

Click here to read the article in full on the Elena Ab Gallery website.

It might not be “press”—as it is on an art gallery website—but it’s a very good article by Michael Carter, whose bio on The New Museum's website reads as follows:

Michael Carter is a poet, writer, performer, and cultural critic, living in New York City. From 1982–92, he was the editor and publisher of the quintessentially East Village literary and arts journal/zine Redtape, and from 1988 to 2003 he was codirector of the MWF Video Club. His poetry and fiction have been published in many magazines and anthologies, including The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry, Up Is Up, But So Is Down: NY’s Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992, and From A Terrace in Prague. He is the author of two books of poems, Broken Noses and Metempsychoses (Fly By Night Press, 1996) and On Bolus Head (Cill Rialaig/En Garde Books, 2012)—poems and prints in collaboration with artist Brian Gormley. He was also lyricist and vocalist for the performance/rock band The Vacuum Bag (1985–96).

Click here to read the article in full on the Elena Ab Gallery website.


July 16 2014

On Wednesday, July 16, 2014, works by Linus Coraggio were featured in the photo triptych that accompanied the New York Times’ coverage of the opening of the new Buddy Warren Inc. shop at 171 Chrystie St. on the Lower East Side.

Five Coraggio pieces were included in the photograph:

  1. “King Chess Set” Chair
  2. “Action Figure” Mirror
  3. “Queen Chess Set” Chair
  4. “White Copper and Black Sun Queen” Chess Set
  5. “Glass Wheel” Chopper
Click here to view the full article on the Times’ website.

November 6 2013

A brief mention about a group show at a DJ scratching school (who knew they existed?) where Coraggio did an installation of sculpture and drawings in November of 2013.

There's a pic of Coraggio at that show in our The Artist With His Work photo gallery.

A brief mention about a group show at a DJ scratching school (who knew they existed?) where Coraggio did an installation of sculpture and drawings in November of 2013.

There's a pic of Coraggio at that show in our The Artist With His Work photo gallery.


May 24 2012

EV Grieve is an East Village blog that seeks to memorialize NYC historical sites, individual histories, etc. This entry focused on a fence Coraggio created in the late ’80s in collaboration with two other artists. It still stands on 1st Ave. and 6th St.

Note that it is only the anonymous commenter who identifies the work as Coraggio’s and adds how “famus” Coraggio is.

Click here to view the entry on the blog’s site.

EV Grieve is an East Village blog that seeks to memorialize NYC historical sites, individual histories, etc. This entry focused on a fence Coraggio created in the late ’80s in collaboration with two other artists. It still stands on 1st Ave. and 6th St.

Note that it is only the anonymous commenter who identifies the work as Coraggio’s and adds how “famus” Coraggio is.

Click here to view the entry on the blog’s site.


May 17 2011

Coraggio won first prize in the group show of garden-themed art discussed in the article—an exhibit at the Haverford (PA) Library in May, 2011. The winning Coraggio work was a watercolor-and-pastel entitled “Fire in the Woods” (click here to view).

Click on the image to read the complete article on the News of Delaware County website.

Coraggio won first prize in the group show of garden-themed art discussed in the article—an exhibit at the Haverford (PA) Library in May, 2011. The winning Coraggio work was a watercolor-and-pastel entitled “Fire in the Woods” (click here to view).

Click on the image to read the complete article on the News of Delaware County website.


April 13 2011

An online review in which the author confesses that s/he “covets” Coraggio’s “Mirro (Relief).”

Click here to read the full article.

An online review in which the author confesses that s/he “covets” Coraggio’s “Mirro (Relief).”

Click here to read the full article.


February 1 2010

Designer Paul Ochs used a Linus Coraggio chair in his Restored Farm House
Designer Paul Ochs used a Linus Coraggio chair in his Restored Farm House

March 27 2008

An article about Coraggio's solo show at The Gershwin Hotel, in which the author asks the reader, “have you ever been captivated by a chair, hunk of metal, deer skull?”

Click here to read the article on the City Guide website.

An article about Coraggio's solo show at The Gershwin Hotel, in which the author asks the reader, “have you ever been captivated by a chair, hunk of metal, deer skull?”

Click here to read the article on the City Guide website.


January 2 2008

Coraggio’s “Hammer & Sickle Chair” featured in the arts calendar section of the Long Island newspaper, Newsday.
Coraggio’s “Hammer & Sickle Chair” featured in the arts calendar section of the Long Island newspaper, Newsday.

August 15 2007

This is awesome:

R.C. Baker praises Linus in his Village Voice column and recommends Coraggio’s show at Michael Steinberg Fine Art:

This is awesome:

R.C. Baker praises Linus in his Village Voice column and recommends Coraggio’s show at Michael Steinberg Fine Art.

Now roll your mouse over the article and you will see Coraggio’s response.

Here's Coraggio's response—sent to the Voice and published in their Letters section the following week:

With Linus Coraggio, flattery really will get you nowhere!

Click here to read full article on the Village Voice website


March 1 2005

Fun Coraggio interview by Toni Schlesinger for the Village Voice about Coraggio's Upper West Side apartment. Click here to read it in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format, or click here to read it on the Voice's website.

Fun Coraggio interview by Toni Schlesinger for the Village Voice about his Upper West Side apartment. Click here to read it in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format, or click here to read it on the Voice's website.

But first, roll your mouse over the article at left to enlarge the photo of Linus hanging around his apartment.

Meanwhile, here’s an enlargement of the article’s photo—Linus hanging around his apartment:


May 13 2000

A funky art blog from May 2000, it shows a head shot of Coraggio (rightmost image of the triptych), whom the author refers to as “Linus Coragio [sic], metal sculptor extrardinaire [sic],” and describes a recent sculptural furniture piece of Coraggio’s along with other art activity in the East Village amongst the glitterati and intelligentsia.

This was during a 3-year period Coraggio had his studio in the backyard of Deepdale Gallery (where he also showed regularly) on the then very un-gentrified east end of Ludlow Street.

“It still smelled like fish from the Chinese packing storefronts,” recalls Coraggio.

A funky art blog from May 2000, it shows a head shot of Coraggio (rightmost image of the triptych), whom the author refers to as “Linus Coragio [sic], metal sculptor extrardinaire [sic],” and describes a recent sculptural furniture piece of Coraggio’s along with other art activity in the East Village amongst the glitterati and intelligentsia.

This was during a 3-year period Coraggio had his studio in the backyard of Deepdale Gallery (where he also showed regularly) on the then very un-gentrified east end of Ludlow Street.

“It still smelled like fish from the Chinese packing storefronts,” recalls Coraggio.


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