Each week, artist Linus Coraggio highlights one of his pieces—offering insight into the origins, inspirations, and aesthetic intentions behind the artwork. You can find The Weld of the Week here, on Facebook, and on Instagram.

November 6 2014 Weld of the Week #8

2B Man (1991)

2B Man (1991) - figurative sculpture by Linus CoraggioThe figure itself is flame-cut steel and welded scrap metal, and stands on a circular pine wood base. Its conception stems from my interest in Candomblé—the Brazilian form of voodoo—and my wish at the time I made it to put some mojo out there to extend the length of my month-to-month lease on my amazing cheap studio in a former gas station on NYC's Lower East Side another 5 years. That is why the figure holds a number 5.

I guess it worked as I was able to keep the studio another 10 years!

(photo credit: Kelly Irwin)

—Linus Coraggio


October 25 2014 Weld of the Week #7

MC Abstract (2005)

MC Abstract (2005) - abstract sculpture by Linus CoraggioThis sculpture is about the feeling of riding a motorcycle (hence the title). I sought to show spatial volumes that approximate a motorcycle’s proportions of aerodynamic wave vibrations (in an abstract manner).

Inspiration came from Italian Futurism and my personal desire to show the intensity of speed and motion in a static 3-D artwork.

A limited-edition Harley-Davidson folding knife designed by the knifesmith David Mann adds a (literally) edgy aspect to the work.

—Linus Coraggio


October 17 2014 1 Comment Weld of the Week #6

Square Flag Coffee Table (2006)

Square Flag Coffee Table (2006) - furniture by Linus CoraggioThe name comes from my impression that the table resembles an abstract flag under the glass. Contrasting types of rusty ornamental iron and angular stainless steel are welded directly to one another to create an interesting synthesis between old and new material.

Structure and composition within the piece flows together quite interestingly in terms of practical cantilevering and aesthetic juxtaposition as well as proportion. I sought to blend two styles (old/new and rough/finished) together in the table and view it as quite successful in that regard.

—Linus Coraggio


^ back to top ^